Gather student feedback in simple fashion while teaching virtually using these done-for-you digital exit tickets.

Digital exit tickets are virtual-based informal assessment tools that show what students “took away” from an online lesson or activity. This feedback is collected remotely and quickly most commonly through Google Slides or Google Forms.

While teachers can use any of these more than 100 exit ticket ideas to assess how well students understood a lesson, digital exit tickets make the process much more convenient for those teaching remotely.

So if you’re teaching virtually, you’ll find the following digital exit tickets a great resource for providing quality closure to almost any lesson or activity.

You could even use these virtual exit slips as a weekly review.

Digital Exit Slips (Google Slides)

Following is the process to access our digital exit tickets via Google Slides…

  1. First, log into your Google account.
  2. Click this link to access the Google Slides links.
  3. You’ll be asked to make a copy of the document which will automatically download into your main folder.
  4. Now you can use the documents for your teaching.

Your students will be able to type their responses into the text box.

If you’re looking to assign these Google Slides to your students via Google Classroom, view instructions explaining how to assign slides with Google Classroom.

Digital Exit Tickets (Google Forms)

Save time creating your own digital exit tickets by using our bundle of 5 free virtual exit tickets created with Google Forms.

The set includes one exit ticket for each core subject area.

Math digital exit ticket example made with Google Forms

To access the digital exit slips via Google Forms…

  1. Log into your Google account.
  2. Click this link to access the links that open to the Google Forms.
  3. You’ll be asked to make a copy of the forms. The copy will by default download to your main Google drive.
  4. Customize the Google Forms digital exit tickets to your liking, and then assign to students!

To customize the prompts on each exit slip, consider using a few of these stems…

  • What is one (1) question that you still have about the lesson?
  • What challenged you today and why?
  • Which parts of the lesson would you like for me to review tomorrow?
  • Which part of the activity has left you puzzled?
  • What is one (1) learning objective that you don’t 100% understand yet?
  • If you had to repeat the lesson right now, what actions would you change so that you were more engaged?
  • How do you relate what I taught today with something you already knew?
  • What are two things from the lesson that you added to your schema today?
  • A key element from today’s lesson…
  • One thing I need my teacher to know about my understanding of (insert any subject or topic) is ….
  • A way the teacher can help me is…
  • One (1) suggestion for how today’s class could be improved is…

More Creative Ways to Use Exit Tickets

Though using exit tickets via Google Forms and Google Slides saves time and is more convenient when teaching virtually, you can absolutely use physical copies of exit slips to gather feedback online.

Traditional exit tickets upload well as images to Google Forms and Google Slides.

Students record information in a text box or through another virtual platform such as Google classroom.

For more exit ticket ideas, view…

>> Reading Exit Slips

>> Math Exit Slips

>> Science Exit Tickets

>> Emoji Exit Slips

>> Varied Collection of Exit Slips for All Subject Areas

Wrapping Up: Assessing With Virtual Exit Tickets

It looks like remote learning is here to stay for a while. So include these digital exit tickets in your assessment toolkit.

In addition to saving time with these quick assessment tools, you’ll gain a better perception of your learners’ knowledge over time, possess documentation of their academic progress, and have data to analyze in order to differentiate future lessons.

Yes, all of this can be done virtually!

What other types of digital exit tickets would you like to see?

Share in the comments below.

Cheers to remote teaching

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